Police Operations: Detailed Progress to Date

  • All Police Department operations plans, effective March 2012, now identify the difference between passive and active resistance and are specific as to the appropriate use of force in each category.  These plans also include guidelines for police use of chemical weapons, including when police can deploy chemical weapons and when officers need prior authorization to deploy such weapons.
  • All police department supervisors have completed Incident Command Structure (ICS) training along with small group leadership and critical incident management training. All officers have received alternative use of force techniques.
  • All police officers attended a use of force training in September 2012. Officers were taught an innovative approach to control and restraint called the Compliance, Direction and Take Down System (CDT System.) Unlike other types of so called non-deadly force systems, the CDT System teaches individuals to physically control or disarm a hostile aggressor, and keep him or her in compliance or completely restrained until help arrives. It addresses peace officer wellbeing and subject safety while decreasing the liability factors of all concerned. The CDT System is viewed as minimal justifiable force and is based on a proven theory that "less is better.” Command approval, absent exigent circumstances, for the use of specialized weapons or OC during a crowd control situation is now standard operating procedure.
  • A formalized citizen report database has been established. This database, IAPRO, affords police command real time review of all use of force reports, citizen complaints, internal affairs investigations, and other various reports. This system also has an established early warning mechanism with set thresholds identifying areas for review. This standardized, formal, and professional system ensures all appropriate reviews and investigations are completed in a timely fashion.
  • POST conducted an audit of all police department background files (June 8 – 12, 2012.) An outside expert was also secured to assist with the review of all policy and protocols. This included the implementation of formalized policy revision utilizing LEXIPOL. Community input has also been sought when reviewing draft policy. POST background and training audits are now complete and corrections have been made and approved.
  • The UC Davis nationally recognized Volunteers in Police Service program (VIPS) launched a new volunteer cadet program in January 2013 to help prepare UC Davis students interested in a career in law enforcement. Three students will receive sponsorship to a local police academy upon graduation. One cadet will be hired as a cadet during the academy then upon successful completion of the academy will be reclassified to a UC Davis Police Officer. More than twenty student positions were created by eliminating two officer positions to fund the new student-run facility security program through the Aggie Host unit. These students work on campus seven nights a week ensuring sensitive facilities are locked and secure. This program has been operating since June 2012 and has proven to be most effective. The police citizens’ academy was marketed for January 2013 and had its highest level of student enrollment with more than thirty students.
  • UC Davis aspires to become a model for campus law enforcement and regain its position as a respected and trusted member of the community. Numerous improvements in policy and procedure are underway. This is evidenced by several changes made in current community policing philosophy. These include having a truly community-based hiring process, citizens’ academy, Police Chief/Staff formal monthly meetings, student cadet program, outreach officers, improved bicycle patrol, draft department-wide policy which seeks input from the community and other changes.
  • Hiring and promotional panels now consist of community members from many areas, including the Associated Students of the University of California, Davis (ASUCD), the Graduate Students Association (GSA), faculty and law enforcement command officers.
  • Police Chief Carmichael announced that UC Davis will adopt the new UCPD policy on Crowd Management, Intervention and Control. The policy highlights the importance of safeguarding constitutional rights and the First Amendment and provides an outline of basic steps to be taken and/or considered by the UC Davis Police Department in the management of demonstrations. In addition, Chief Carmichael continues to receive input on the policy from the campus community and the ACLU, most recently during a meeting with the ACLU on April 22, 2013.
  • UC Davis Police Department has purchased five wearable video cameras to be used in various situations including protest activity.  The camera, a VIEVU PVR-LE2 is simple to use and contains video and audio recording devices that are pinned to the front of an officer’s shirt.  Each camera bears a clear, discernible label that reads: “CAMERA”.  This designation is meant to inform members of the public that an exchange with the police officer is being filmed and audio taped. UC Davis also developed a procedure to ensure that, during a large or potentially troublesome event, cameras are deployed into the field at specific locations.  Typically this includes putting a camera on the field commander, arrest teams and line officers to provide a variety of views of the activity.  Each significant incident then may be filmed from five different placements.  This is to ensure that the full spectrum of interaction is recorded and available for subsequent viewing.  This is a tremendous educational resource and will assist in resolving complaints and in determining how specific events were managed and/or how they might have benefitted from different approaches.  The university also utilizes in-car cameras on police vehicles and ensures, as standard operating procedure.  The cameras are activated when transporting prisoners or when near the scene of activity.  All recording is covered under the various policies listed below.  UC Davis is one of a few departments in the country that actually has a policy related to the public video recording of officers and how officers shall respond entitled ,  “Video Recording and Photographing of UCDPD Members by the Public”. In addition, UC Davis provides officer training on all video devices and the rules of evidence apply to video same as any other evidence.  Campus Tasers have video recording devices built into them as safeguards for both officers and the public.
  • All events, including protests and pre-planned events—not related to protests, but out of the ordinary—all require an after-action report. These after-action reports are stored for easy access in a simple computer database.